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20121226
20130103
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CSPAN 9
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such conversations we're having with retiring members. jonas freight sit down with ben nelson -- join us for a sit down with ben nelson. he helped forge a domination. that is 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. interviews with two retired house members. first jerry lewis and later, a conversation with california lynn woolsey. the epa administrator has announced her decision to resign her posts in january. the chief environmental watchdog is stepping down after a nearly four this year tenure , new controls on coal-fired plants. jackson found herself caught between administration pledges to solve controversial problems and steady resistant from groups that complaint the rules destroy jobs and make it harder for american companies to compete internationally. that is from the ap. steny hoyer will talk about the looming fiscal cliff during a briefing later today. that will be about 2:15 eastern and we'll have that life for you here on c-span. kent conrad is retiring after 26 years in office. he talked about partisanship in the senate and his time working on economic issues including his time on the bowle
interviews with retiring members of congress. at 8:00 p.m. easter, senator ben nelson of nebraska talks about his two terms and his time as a member of the gang of six. then at 8:40, represented jerry lewis of california on his 17 terms in congress. that is followed at 9:15 with representative lynn woolsey on her anti-war work. that is thursday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, here on c-span. >> tonight, a discussion on corporations in pursuit of high stock values. then a group economist explains why he believes the u.s. is responsible for the global financial crisis. later, interviews with retiring members of congress. on tomorrow morning's washington journal, we are asking business owners to call in and talk about the fiscal cliff and their plans for next year. then we will continue with the forecast for the coming years housing market. that is all about more discussion of the fiscal cliff negotiations as congress returns to washington. we will be joined by steve forbes. later, discussion on background checks, how they work, who gets them, and when they are required. our guest is matt bennett. "washin
recently had with nebraska democratic senator ben nelson. he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. here is a brief look. >> what is your thought about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another. i think the word compromise is over used, underutilized and misunderstood by an awful lot of people
. we spoke with ben nelson. that is followed by a jerry lewis -- by jerry lewis. senator ben nelson is retiring fr the senate aft 12 yea he spoke to us about why he thinks compromise in the senate is not a four-letter word. this is 40 minutes. >> thank you for spending a half-hour with us to talk about your 12 years in washington. it ended with the reelection of barack obama. if you could think of adjectives, what would they be to describe these seven years? >> interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. full of opportunities for the country. there were good times during these 12 years, laced together with some that were not so good. 9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal of this. abyss.thi i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single even
, but every day we had this not in our stomach and would like to get over it. we heard ben shapiro speak to us and he said we've got to go after the media. it's time for him. he's got that forum, but what can we be sitting here and going home to her normal lives? >> well, who's to stop you from mocking them wherever you want to go? i'm lucky i can say whatever i want. you can tell me what to say. recently that's it people do if they find me and say you have to say this. sometimes i actually say it. but the whole thing is to keep good humor and know that you're right. you always have to know that you're right and not be shaken. [applause] >> we've got time for tumor questions. >> i was wondering if you could tell people like myself who has been a leading liberal within 100 miles of him how you possibly influence those people. >> basically the only way -- it sounds kind of erika, but aoa clec i never felt left and right with a horizontal relationship. i whistle it was vertical, that you start your end of that. it's not original idea. the old line is what is a conservative? a liberal who's been m
could get really volatile next week if ben austen this situation. host: cliff talks down to the wire. guest: that's right. majority leader harry reid yesterday said we might not even have time to get a deal even if we reach an agreement, just because of the mechanics of the house and senate and how long it takes to pass legislation. i think if they get a deal, they can somehow get it through. there's no room for error. if they come out of the meeting at the white house today and everyone shrugged their shoulders and says there's no way we can do this, that sends a signal to the american people that we are going over the cliff. you think?doe guest: we're going over the cliff probably. republicans are so dug in on this issue. they got into the house and senate based on their views on taxes, medicare, social security. it is hard to imagine in the next three days they will have some huge concession and reversed the views they have held 20, 30, 40 years. at the same token, maybe they will say what will happen to the economy is so damaging that i have to compromise my position, and that wi
cuts. the concern we have and that is prompted by ben bernanke or the congressional budget office or lot of outsiders, looking at the way the fiscal cliff is structured, where finds that it actually has too much debt as a production, and i say that as someone who generally does not worry about too much depth as a production, because politicians are so unlikely to reduce the deficit much, but if we went over the cliff, there would be in too what steps the production. takes a wax and domestic discretionary spending -- it takes a big whack at domestic discretionary spending. so we should replace the fiscal cliff with more thoughtful deficit-reduction. make sure that you reduce the deficit in a way that is phased in gradually so we don't seem too much this year. we are all aware the economy's not going as well as it should be. if there's a way to do this more gradually, it would be better for the economy, but you need to lock in the changes so we know we are serious and stick with them, and that it is done more thoughtfully. so that it is an across-the- board hit at many but not all p
are a fierce believer in independence of thought, and dissent, and not even george washington or ben franklin might've had a complete monopoly on all of this so it was usual that you had at george mason critiquing it. >> i think george mason seems like a pretty stubborn guy. the other thing was that you know, i think that he made it clear, he did not undermine the process. if you go back and look at the last days, george mason did not throw a monkey wrench into the works. what he did was he made it clear. he made it absolutely clear, he had his list of objections. he thought you needed a bill of rights. he was not a politician. he had -- he was not into making a lot of friends and allies. he was going to argue his point and then he was going to return. i happen to think that was pretty effective. he wasn't against it. remember he was very helpful in developing the constitution, with a strong national government. but, he wanted to build this wall that would make it clear that did not exist in sort of contradiction or in opposition to these individual rights. again, he wasn't cynical. he wasn't
comprise the seven republicans and seven democrats to spearhead with john warner, john mccain, and ben nelson. it was born to avert an institutional crisis as a result of repeated, systematic filibustering of president bush's judicial nominees in the senate. in response, the republican majority were going to exercise the nuclear option and it would have jettisoned longstanding rules requiring 60 votes to end a filibuster. the 60-vote threshold has always been protecting the rights of the minority, but when it becomes just a simple majority vote? how that happened? it would have had enormous implications for the future of the senate. just as we were about to cross the political rubicon, the gang of 14 forced a pact based on mutual trust that we would only support a filibuster under what we labeled as extraordinary circumstances and we would oppose the nuclear option. it embodies the very manifestation of the power of sense is building. as this body contemplates changes to its rules in the next congress, i would urge all my colleagues who are returning to follow the gang of 14 and exerci
of the wall street journal. >> we will break away. live now to the capital. that is senator ben nelson from nebraska, retiring, make your marks on c-span. -- making remarks on c-span. thank you. we thought we would catch a moment of his comments, which were brief. we're standing by four senators coming back from their party caucuses. caller: the other thing is harry reid has not voted on over 40 bills the republicans have put up there, and he blames republicans. , isopod you were supposed to bring bills up there and talk about them and vote on then. they have not pass a budget in over four years. they are not being responsible for that. guest: that is what makes him such a powerful figure. they said we sent you the legislation that would help the deficit cannot help create more jobs, and democrats in the senate have not acted. democrats say those are partisan bills with no bipartisan support. that is why the leader -- senate leader reid is going to be at the white house today because his signing off on anything is vital. guest: one of the things we sell was financial markets to end it out m
releasing solo albums produced by ben folds two is wonderful himself. she is best known as a social media queen rock-and-roll. she is engaged with her fans through social media and is known for finding her next album via kickstarter, a pay-what- you-like for my music model. welcome amanda. [applause] >> highlight to begin by agreeing that predictions are bullshit and social media is also bullshit. that being said, it helps me a lot. not so much the prediction that i would make, but everything that has happened to me in the last few months, the kickstarter i did that raised over $1 million, it brought a discussion of about my use of twitter and connecting i have done with my audience and my fans. the conversation that i hear happening every year between artists and musicians is that people are beginning to measure the cost of connections. and by that, i mean you have people engaging on your behalf as the artist and engaging constantly with fans. the pros and cons are starting to shake out. the past few months, these sorts of people coming to me are my uncle that is a very successful person
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11